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IBioS Job Talks

Juan Carlos Villaseñor-Derbez, Ph.D. Candidate, Bren School of Environmental Science & Management, UC Santa Barbara

Juan Carlos Villaseñor-Derbez is a Ph.D. Candidate at the Bren School of Environmental Science & Management in UC Santa Barbara. He holds a B.Sc. in Oceanography from Universidad Autónoma de Baja California (Mexico) and a Master of Environmental Science and Management from UCSB. As an Environmental Scientist, he asks questions around the design and evaluation of policy interventions related to the conservation of biodiversity. His work combines Ecological and Economic theory with Econometric and Data Science techniques to understand how interventions shape human behavior and its effect on environmental and economic outcomes. Juan Carlos is also a Latin American Fisheries Fellow and currently leads EcoDataScience at UCSB.

Research Seminar:  Design and evaluation of conservation interventions

January 13, 10:30am-12:00pm; Register here: https://ubc.zoom.us/meeting/register/u5cod-mgqTsoGdBKysYW9QzsWQvdBfGQeRT4

Teaching Seminar:  Instrumental Variables in the Environmental Sciences

January 14, 9:00-10:00am; Register here: https://ubc.zoom.us/meeting/register/u5Yrf-itqDIvH9Yptzz5COZ_gM8X0Tm_LIQh

Grad Student Roundtable (Open to graduate students from Biodiversity Research Centre, IRES, and Land and Food Systems) 

January 14, 12:00-12:45pm, Join Zoom Meeting: https://ubc.zoom.us/j/66488338018?pwd=em1tMDdUa3RvUVFLeWNmM0RsN1lRQT09

Meeting ID: 664 8833 8018; Passcode: 055082


Jennifer Raynor, Assistant Professor, Department of Economics, College of the Environment, Wesleyan University 

Jennifer Raynor is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics and the College of the Environment at Wesleyan University. Her research focuses on the economics of fisheries and wildlife management, with an emphasis on measuring the feedback between human and natural systems. She strives to inform on-the-ground decision-making and works closely with state and federal resource managers to design and evaluate conservation policies. Her main topical interests include human-carnivore coexistence, marine spatial planning, and non-market valuation. Dr. Raynor graduated summa cum laude with a B.A. in Economics at LeMoyne College. She then earned an M.A. in Applied Economics at Johns Hopkins University, followed by an M.S. in Environment and Resources and Ph.D. in Agricultural and Applied Economics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She has been on the faculty at Wesleyan University since 2019. Before moving to academia, she worked for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, where she conducted research on U.S. fisheries management.

Research Seminar:  Wolves make roadways safer, generating large economic returns to predator conservation

January 18, 10:30am-12:00pm, Register here: https://ubc.zoom.us/meeting/register/u5Erfu-pqT4jE9Uu7xbsEadkexa-Q39NkhP4

Teaching Seminar:  How much wildlife is enough? Theory and measurement challenges 

January 19, 9:00-10:00am, Register here: https://ubc.zoom.us/meeting/register/u5Iqce6grj8tE9R2KxW-UTFj0yzJar5q1-0M

Grad Student Roundtable (Open to graduate students from Biodiversity Research Centre, IRES, and Land and Food Systems)

January 19, 12:00-12:45pm, Join Zoom Meeting : https://ubc.zoom.us/j/65399303067?pwd=a05USzM4cDlQQjVET1dKMjNld3pNQT09

Meeting ID: 653 9930 3067; Passcode: 235242


Joséphine Gantois, Postdoctoral Fellow, Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability, UBC

Joséphine Gantois is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability at the University of British Columbia, in the research group of Claire Kremen. Her research combines statistical approaches and data from economics, ecology, remote sensing, and machine learning to assess and address humans’ ecological footprint in natural and agricultural landscapes. She currently studies the biodiversity impacts and economic feasibility of different farming strategies, in order to understand how to feed the world while minimizing our environmental footprint.  Dr. Gantois received a PhD from the Sustainable Development program at Columbia University. There, she combined environmental and natural resource economics with ecology, to study plant physiology, phenology, and ecology processes, which matter for sustainable development. In particular, she overcomes the challenge of monitoring and manipulating ecosystems and species at scale, by exploiting tools from causal inference, remote sensing, and machine learning.  Prior to her PhD, she graduated from the Ecole Polytechnique with a multidisciplinary bachelor in Science and Engineering, and a masters in Economics and Public Policy, as well as from the London School of Economics, with an MPA in International Development. She has worked with the Social Protection Unit and Human Development Network of the World Bank, and with development and trade economists at the Columbia Business School.

Research Seminar:  Bridging economics and ecology for elucidating humans’ ecological footprint across natural and agricultural systems

January 20, 10:30am-12:00pm, Register here:    https://ubc.zoom.us/meeting/register/u5wldOCuqD0qH90ugTvEnJQcbVRcS0zRe9lC

Teaching Seminar:  Causal Inference for Environmental and Conservation Policy: Introduction to Instrumental Variables

January 21, 9:00-10:00am, Register here: https://ubc.zoom.us/meeting/register/u5MlceqqrjMsHdE3Oj5UhEVGlUJO1ju52gTN

Grad Student Roundtable (Open to graduate students from Biodiversity Research Centre, IRES, and Land and Food Systems)

January 21, 12:00-12:45pm, Join Zoom Meeting: https://ubc.zoom.us/j/62723474063?pwd=eXlnK3ZIMHhDKzRPSzJjL1RDckJ6UT09

Meeting ID: 627 2347 4063 ; Passcode: 710209


Xiurou Wu, Ph.D. candidate, Agricultural and Resource Economics, University of California, Davis

Xiurou Wu is a Ph.D. candidate in Agricultural and Resource Economics at the University of California, Davis. She received a B.A. in Economics at Nankai University (China) and an M.S. in Applied Economics at Oregon State University. Xiurou’s research builds micro-foundations for conservation and resource management problems, to address the wellbeing of people who depend on the resources and the health of ecosystems. To solve these challenging problems, Xiurou employs integrated modeling, dynamic optimization, mathematical programming, and econometrics. Xiurou also looks beyond economics for state-of-the-art numerical tools to tackle these often nonsmooth dynamic resource management problems.  Her current research includes conflicting ecosystem services in working landscapes, predictive models of commercial fishing behavior for policy evaluation, and economic impacts of marine protected areas.

Research Seminar:  Modeling ecosystem service conflicts in China’s Lake Poyang - balancing economic and ecological goals

January 27, 10:30am-12:00pm, Register here: https://ubc.zoom.us/meeting/register/u5Mlce2tpj0sE9Md91FXThmkPbqigVzJYw_g

Teaching Seminar:  Using instrumental variables for causal inference in environmental and natural resource economics 

January 28, 9:00-10:00am, Register here: https://ubc.zoom.us/meeting/register/u5Ird-GqrTIiGt0u4BaM76q68odpwClxuCep

Grad Student Roundtable (Open to graduate students from Biodiversity Research Centre, IRES, and Land and Food Systems)

January 28, 12:00-12:45pm, Join Zoom Meeting : https://ubc.zoom.us/j/61790644538?pwd=Vkh1VW1EZWtWWjZzRXFPWFVxUWhzQT09

Meeting ID: 617 9064 4538; Passcode: 201887


Katherine Siegel, NOAA Climate and Global Change Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Colorado-Boulder 

Katherine Siegel is a NOAA Climate and Global Change postdoctoral fellow at the University of Colorado-Boulder. She integrates interdisciplinary approaches from econometrics, land system science, and conservation science to identify and quantify drivers of change in social-ecological systems. Her research seeks to inform just and sustainable management of working landscapes for biodiversity and people. Her work spans multiple systems, scales, and ecosystems, from national parks in the Amazon Basin to ranches in California. In her current work, Katherine combines econometrics, ecological functional trait analysis, and ecosystem service modeling to understand the links between forest management, wildfire severity, and post-fire ecosystem functioning in the forests of the western US. She received her PhD in Environmental Science, Policy, and Management at the University of California-Berkeley in 2021.

Research Seminar:  The fate of working landscapes: causal analysis in social-ecological systems

February 3, 10:30am-12:00pm, Register here: https://ubc.zoom.us/meeting/register/u5Isd-GspzspHNxBJyf1-ttvPGuWcxD294M9

Teaching Seminar:  Instrumental variables for causal inference in conservation science

February 4, 9:00-10:00am , Register here: https://ubc.zoom.us/meeting/register/u5Epdu-srzooHdCL2nykzzG6Kiesl3TUNF0E

Grad Student Roundtable (Open to graduate students from Biodiversity Research Centre, IRES, and Land and Food Systems)

February 4, 12:00-12:45pm, Join Zoom Meeting : https://ubc.zoom.us/j/66866501239?pwd=WEpUYVVtS3BscWRGZnhwSlNRUWpWZz09

Meeting ID: 668 6650 1239; Passcode: 890269